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1600 OHC Pinto tuning

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Have a customer with a 1600 OHC matching numbers Capri.

That engine needs a rebuild with probably new pistons.

 

That engine has to stay as its matching numbers and I agree.

 

He want's some more horsies if possible otherwise if not possible just see whats possible.

 

Which way to go ??

 

Four Branch exhaust is on the Capri. Weber 32/36 DGAV has to stay.

 

Nobody sells anything for the 1600 OHC Pinto, only for the 2.0. Guess some knoledge must be available, here on OSF.

Kent 1600 can be made to 1700 but what about Pinto.

Cam wise, what cams have good results ( Torque ).

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You can get lots more power from a 1600 . I use to own a 1600 GT mk3 cortina and modified it with good results . The GT head had bigger valves and a 2 ltr cam as standard . These heads are hard to find now and are not unleaded either . You can get 1600 Pistons that are plus 90 making it 1.7 near as dam . eBay item 281114961074 . I fitted a FR32 cam kit and that worked very well . Webber manifold and 32/36 was also standard on the 1.6 GT along with a GT manifold . This could be upgraded to a 2 inch Ashley system and manifold , you can buy these off the shelf . Being a Capri it might already have a type 9 gear box 5 speed if not it would be a good upgrade .

All in all just typical pinto upgrades . Should see a 100 bhp set up right .

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Some may think it strange to place importance on the matching serial numbers but it does go a long way as the platform to claim an original car if you are lucky to have the engine the car came out of the factory with. Having the original Pinto in my Mk2 which I too decided I wanted to maintain the engine long term and one of the things I decided was not to bore it within a thousandth of inch of its life just for a few a few extra horsepower. Ford offer 20, 40 and 60 thou oversized pistons and felt it was worth sticking to that to get three complete rebuilds out of it. People would argue you can sleeve it but I have seen them fail especially at extreme bore sizes and ruining the block. I have never heard of anyone re-sleeving more than once? I remember it being mentioned once its not good for the strength and integrity of the block when you have an easier and more viable way by re-boring at anticipated intervals denoted by the manufacture.   Balance it by all means but with the minimum oversize needed and then get whatever extra you need too from the head. With Pintos you can gain more from a good manifold than you do from over boring. Thats just my view as someone wanting to maintain the car for the long term over a bit of extra stick around town.  Priorities differ. Those that want the big hp numbers usually treat the blocks as single rebuild disposable and matching numbers not really needed.

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I totally agree . Keep it to a min on the over bore but had to answer the question on whether you can get over sized Pistons for a 1600 pinto . Like on a xflow up to a 1.7 . I've done the 2.1 pinto route only to fine that the block is now useless as you carnt go any bigger .

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There's also nothing wrong with putting the original engine in a nice secure sealed wooden box and build an engine that makes you really happy.

 

That way you can go silly with modifications and horsepower until you are blue in the face, and know that the original engine is tucked away warm and safe and snug.

 

There is also the argument not to modify the original engine because then it is non factory.

 

If the car is bought up for sale it can still be advertised with the original matching numbers engine, which can be sold with the car.

 

In many cases such as this keeping the original engine in the car is non productive because of lack of power when the money can be better spent on say the 2 litre or larger engine.

 

The numbers on the block are only numbers, and have no relationship to ease of driving, enjoyment etc.

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only for the purists it is important to have all original factory build, to keep its value. In this case i would leave it as it is, just engine rebuild.

But numbers as Peter said are just numbers. If the block was shot, you would have to replace it anyway, doesnt do of its value

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There's also nothing wrong with putting the original engine in a nice secure sealed wooden box and build an engine that makes you really happy.

 

That way you can go silly with modifications and horsepower until you are blue in the face, and know that the original engine is tucked away warm and safe and snug.

 

There is also the argument not to modify the original engine because then it is non factory.

 

If the car is bought up for sale it can still be advertised with the original matching numbers engine, which can be sold with the car.

 

In many cases such as this keeping the original engine in the car is non productive because of lack of power when the money can be better spent on say the 2 litre or larger engine.

 

The numbers on the block are only numbers, and have no relationship to ease of driving, enjoyment etc.

 

This is probably not one of those cases though. This engine needs a rebuild, it would probably be a bit extravagant to rebuilt it just to pop in a crate to later sell with the car for someone else to get the benefit of then to also buy an rebuild another for use in the car.  He also mentions that although more power would be desirable keeping the original engine is an important aspect. The impression given is to rebuild and use. There are certainly a notable boost in power to be had from the head while keeping the bottom end original and externally looking all original. Are high torque cams like the FR30 able to be used in 1600 Pintos? I would be curious what cam options you come up with JP?

 

Matching numbers and originality to some can be part of their enjoyment knowing its all close to factory. I know owners that match month and year part numbers because it gives them the satisfaction of having the car exactly of the period. While I personally dont go to that extreme I do admire the dedication and intent of those that do. What floats ones boat is very much an individual thing. Some even have more than one car, one totally original and another fire breather so they can dabble in either vice as the mood requires. :wink:

 

only for the purists it is important to have all original factory build, to keep its value. In this case i would leave it as it is, just engine rebuild.

But numbers as Peter said are just numbers. If the block was shot, you would have to replace it anyway, doesnt do of its value

 

Its true an all original car is just for the purists but a matching engine number appeals to many others on a number of different levels. Im certain with the sale of any car and you were to read "original engine" that casts a certain image that the car hasnt been around the world a few times and that it still has much of its original make up. Even if the buyer was going to heavily modify the car themselves they would still be seen as a worthy thing to purchase.

 

We never got 1600 Pintos here, all our 1600s are Kent based. It seems a rare thing few decide to keep original as a 2lt version is such an easy swap. In years to come I think the rarity of original 1600 Pinto cars will bring some added value to its collectability. If you bought an original Mk2 Mexico would you take the one with its original engine or the one with a more powerful 2lt Engine in it?

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It seems to be that the 1600 gt or s head are the same as the 2ltr head valves and camshaft , the combustion is are also the same 9,2.

The camshaft from a 1600 s/gt has a yellow code.

The foto on top is from a 2ltr big valve head.

On the other 2  pic`s are from a capri mk2/3 1600 s.

post-14657-0-73982200-1497293605_thumb.jpg

post-14657-0-54748600-1497293626_thumb.jpg

post-14657-0-85389100-1497293646_thumb.jpg

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only for the purists it is important to have all original factory build, to keep its value. In this case i would leave it as it is, just engine rebuild.

 

 

In that case I would rebuild with no modifications to preserve the value and the feel of the original vehicle.

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Thing is, I have nothing to say. Customer pays the bill. I give him what he pays for.

 

Fact is, he doens't drive it 100K miles in his live so it doesn't matter if we go to the max bore as he won't wear that bore out. Its inside the engine and nobody will ever tell. But I sure like the 100bhp figur.

Stock appearance, matching numbers and 100bhp. I quite like the idea.

 

That High Torque cam is what I was thinking about to. Will do some calculations on that with Dyno Desktop.

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Fr30 is a good cam see Janey/Danish on hear . She has one fitted to a 2.1 pinto . Standard 1600 GT engine was 88 bhp . 100+ achievable .

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Fr30 is a good cam see Janey/Danish on hear . She has one fitted to a 2.1 pinto .

 

Say her name and she appears!

 

Yes, I like the FR30 - lots of grunt from low down the rev range. 

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A stock 2 litre cam is a good upgrade on a 1600 IIRC. Cheap as chips too.

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Say her name and she appears!

 

Yes, I like the FR30 - lots of grunt from low down the rev range.

 

Big fan of the FR30 myself, having recently had one fitted. Was swaying that way, but the rolling road printout you posted on a thread regarding a question I asked made the decision for me.

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Big fan of the FR30 myself, having recently had one fitted. Was swaying that way, but the rolling road printout you posted on a thread regarding a question I asked made the decision for me.

 

Hows that FR30 going now that its run in?

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Hows that FR30 going now that its run in?

It is much better than the old cam in every aspect. Car idles better and just pulls harder through the gears.

Not done a power run on a rolling road, but it just feels so much better all round.

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It is much better than the old cam in every aspect. Car idles better and just pulls harder through the gears.

Not done a power run on a rolling road, but it just feels so much better all round.

 

You should start a thread about it and a complete review. What mods you have to do with the head and follower and spring choices. Its the most asked about cam on the forum. Building a technical thread with other users participating would really become a reference thread for others.

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Pinto likes compression but the FR30 won't take a wild increase unless you go to Super unleaded so 10 to 1 should be ok, you'll achieve that with a thinner gasket and a skim or deck the Bloch and stick with standard gasket.

Power is all in the head but you don't need to go mad, bigger inlets with the port opened to match, round off the short side turn waisted stem valves with 3 angle seats then its about a proper rolling road tune. Can't we why you couldn't get near 2.0L power as you only want 12bhp / 15%

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