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Kent FR30 Sports Torque V's Kent FR32 Fast Road Cam Kit (2.0 Pinto)

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Started to do my winter work on my car and first up is the engine (2.0 Pinto):

 

First issue I've come up against is my current camshaft has worn some of it's lobes fairly badly. Therefore, I'm looking to replace it with either a FR30 or FR32.  Both cams claim a 16bhp increase over standard OEM.  Car is used mainly on the road and a little bit off Hooning in a closed off industrial area. Not pulled the head off yet, but I think the current cam is possibly a FR32 according to the previous owners data.

 

I'm leaning towards the FR30, as this brings the power in 1500rpm earlier than the FR32. However, it does state that the spring retainers have to be machined to prevent coil binding.  Also thinking of sending the head of to CNC Heads for machining/flowing and bigger valves while it's off.

 

What's your thought on these choices and who's got what fitted?

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Personally, with a big valve head, I would use a Piper285 cam. Didn't like my FR32 at all but loved the Piper one

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The FR30 is the high torque one isnt it?

The FR30 is the high torque one isnt it?

Yes Buddy, it's the high torque cam. Description states that spring retainers need machining with this kit though.

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Personally, with a big valve head, I would use a Piper285 cam. Didn't like my FR32 at all but loved the Piper one

Hadn't looked at the Piper 285, but have heard decent comments about them. Appreciate the feedback and will have a look into it now.

 

Did you have to do any additional work to fit the 285 cam, such as machining the head or pistons?

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I love my FR30, lots of torque, almost from idle upwards which makes it very usable. But it doesn't give big BHP figures.

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Yes Buddy, it's the high torque cam. Description states that spring retainers need machining with this kit though.

 

I heard they recommended heavy duty single springs to go with them and hadnt heard the retainers need machining. Is this possibly a different cure for the same issue?

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Hadn't looked at the Piper 285, but have heard decent comments about them. Appreciate the feedback and will have a look into it now.

 

Did you have to do any additional work to fit the 285 cam, such as machining the head or pistons?

that's what i heard from my engine builder too, about Piper cams. 

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Hi Danish, what spec is the head you're running?

 

It's a 205 head, with big valves on inlet and exhaust, enlarged exhaust ports (but standard inlet), "some material removed around the valve throats", vernier cam pulley, FR30 kit. 

 

The last dyno run:

dyno%20-%201.jpg

 
Eye candy:

oct%2013%20-%2011.jpg

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It's a 205 head, with big valves on inlet and exhaust, enlarged exhaust ports (but standard inlet), "some material removed around the valve throats", vernier cam pulley, FR30 kit. 

 

The last dyno run:

dyno%20-%201.jpg

 
Loving the look of that setup. Nice figures too.
 
Could never fault Tommy when setting up an old skool car.  Top bloke.
 
Well, I've never been so excited to have a knackered cam.  My last Rolling Road session only gave 125bhp at the Flywheel and I was quite dissapointed.  Just took the head off earlier and know I know why.
 
The reported Performance Cam that was supposed to be in my engine was a standard Sierra Injection jobby according to its code.  Head also has the original Ford valves in with one not even sealing whatsover.
Pistons are also standard size, but are about 2mm below the 205 block at TDC.  I've been told that this engine had Transit Pistons and Rods, but I'm starting to doubt any of the spec on this engine.
 
On a positive note, I might as well pull the block out now and get some High Comp Pistons fitted, with a bit of crank and flywheel machining also thrown into the mix.
 
Build is going to have to be based on a bit of a budget due to my Daughter getting married next year, so I can't go overboard . Most of the spannering will be done by myself.  Any tips on what bits you guys have used and what specs you have are much appreciated and welcome. Just remember my little girl needs a dress, so nothing mad... :-D  

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Just be sure to be accurate with your compression. Ideally 10.5:1 ish is good in a road car. In my own experience, I tried lots of different set ups and combos but I can honestly say the best thing we ever did was buy a Vulcan maxiflo 2 head. It unleashed the beast and was like night n day against the previous ported injection head. If I were building another hot Pinto,it would be the 1st thing id buy! Not cheap buy worth EVERY penny!

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The high torque low overlap cams don't need as much compression, you should be wary of to much compression with them, I think 10 to 1 ok

The longer duration more overlap cams like more compression about 10.5 to 1 on cast pistons on the street seems fine

I got 130 bhp and similar torque on a standard injection engine with FR32 and bike carbs.

You should know what all your components are going to be before building so you can optimise for the combination.

For most applications big inlets properly matched to opened out port throats and decent seats will give good results without excessive cost

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The high torque low overlap cams don't need as much compression, you should be wary of to much compression with them, I think 10 to 1 ok

 

 

That's interesting. My block is higher compression due to boring to 2.1 - but not changing the volume of the combustion bowl. It also had a light skim of head and block for fitting. I don't know what the CR is though.  :-s

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The high torque low overlap cams don't need as much compression, you should be wary of to much compression with them, I think 10 to 1 ok

The longer duration more overlap cams like more compression about 10.5 to 1 on cast pistons on the street seems fine

I got 130 bhp and similar torque on a standard injection engine with FR32 and bike carbs.

You should know what all your components are going to be before building so you can optimise for the combination.

For most applications big inlets properly matched to opened out port throats and decent seats will give good results without excessive cost

 

Good info and thankyou.  Keep the tips and ideas coming guys.  I'm hoping to visit a Machine Shop in Brynmawr next Friday, as I've got a day off. Will see what services they have to offer.

 

Been having a bit of a mooch in the garage earlier, as the girls have gone off shopping and left me.  Anyway, this set-up gets worse.  Was having a squint over the engine bay and only just noticed the the inlet manifold...

 

Other pics show the cam lobe flat spot and also the low compression of the piston heights:

post-12853-0-06495700-1477749864_thumb.jpg

post-12853-0-72449200-1477750083_thumb.jpg

post-12853-0-56224800-1477750393_thumb.jpg

post-12853-0-73146700-1477750446_thumb.jpg

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Ideally, the pistons should sit slightly proud of the block. Do it properly,do it once. Either that or make the same mistakes we all did trying to do it cheap and live to regret it having spent ££££ :lol:

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Ideally, the pistons should sit slightly proud of the block. Do it properly,do it once. Either that or make the same mistakes we all did trying to do it cheap and live to regret it having spent ££££ :lol:

Haha, rub it in :-) My daughter, wife and mother in law all went shopping today and put a deposit on a dress. I had a £5.5k savings policy mature this month and that's already been taken and put aside by my Missus for the wedding. Although I love my daughter, does she actually realise what condition my engine is in?

 

I've been running this engine for 3 years like this, but not delved inside it as it was always running OK. I'd like to have a big power build, but if I'm honest with myself, I think I have to set my budget to a max of £1200.

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i would go for a fresh rebuild on the engine, and then if fitting a new cam, buy as a kit. If you have standard bottom end a mild cam gets you enough power for road.

And most of all driveabilty. Example from Burton :  http://www.burtonpower.com/kent-cams-mild-road-camshaft-kit-ford-sohc-pinto-carb-kcfr31k.html

 

This cam kit does not need any mods. to the cyl.head, can be used as replacement for standard cam. Running on 40 dcoe sidedraft carbs 32 chokes is large enough, rejetting to suit the needs.

Its the head what makes power, optimal flow is what you would be aiming for. There are some issues that might be adressed for running " wilder "profiles. Like installed v.spring hight, max. compressed

height, prevent spring coil bound. ect. Always check valve to piston clearance. And like others said, comp.ratio 10,5 : 1 is enough for road use.

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I personally would buy a new head for £700 and spend the rest on new seals, gaskets, shells and bearings etc. Any leftover I would replace the cam. Then once set up, you can upgrade to 45's when funds allow. I wouldn't waste even £200 on 40's. They are just too small if your engine flows well. A dgas would do for up to 150bhp and then 45's take u up to 170 plus..

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I think he's looking for a setup for "fast road" use with good driveability.  OHC 2.0 on 40 dcoe cope well to 130 hp. 

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Car is currently running on Fireblade carbs, which seem to be doing OK.

Cam is a must, as this one is worn badly. Head is definitely on the cards, as I'm hearing so many say that a good flowing head is where a lot of the magic works.

New pistons are another road I have to ho down as well, due to the current ones being low compression. Engine is a 205 block on standard bore size, so need to decide what bore size to go for.

Removed the radiator today, which looks like an original Ford spec, bit the bottom of it is looking pretty rough. Looks like this is also going to eat into the budget too.

Think I'll have to man up tonight and tell my Betty that I'm upping my budget. :-):-):-)

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That's interesting. My block is higher compression due to boring to 2.1 - but not changing the volume of the combustion bowl. It also had a light skim of head and block for fitting. I don't know what the CR is though. :-s

My injection head 2.1 with Adjusa 1mm gasket was about 9.8 to 1

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Well I went the 2.1 twice one with +2.25 and the next with 93mm Cologne Pistons modified for Cosworth rods

If I was doing it all again I would not obsess about 2.1 but go for +1mm with forged pistons on the Cosworth rods, you would then have an unbreakable bottom end capable of 8000 rpm and any compression ratio you could want to help match the cam

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Piston protrusion is an imotive issue, the reason is to improve squish when the piston gets close to the head, if you run proud then gasket thickness is important, a 1mm gasket would mean the piston is close to contacting the head at high rpm.

0.9 mm static gap for fast road.

Because all my big valve heads are old they have been skimmed a lot giving about 42cc chambers so I need the piston down the bore and a thicker gasket to get to 10.7 to 1

Piston deck height was stamped on my +2.25 at -0,25mm and was correct on injection rods

My V6 Pistons -0.38mm and was correct with Cosworth rods as V6 Cologne piston deck height is 1.5mm lower and Cosworth rods are 1.5mm longer

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