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Cuili1

Black RS2000 Restoration

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Due to popular demand LOL, I thought I'd start a restoration post.

I've own the RS2000 close to 6 years now. It's a black with black interior Custom. It has already got a massive amount of paperwork with it, showing it's history. It came to me pretty much standard, with the exception of a full exhaust system, lowered springs on the front, lowering blocks on the rear and a crap sunroof. Oh and four strange switches in the centre console!

For it's age, it's was already a good car, passing it's MOT every year no problem, but I thought I would jump in and go for a restoration to catch anything while I can and get the wee bits and bob's back to standard.

 

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Looks a good shell. Rather you than me though. I wouldnt get my car dipped as i doubt there would be a lot left of it!

Good luck with the resto :thumbsup:

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13 minutes ago, Rich T said:

Looks a good shell. Rather you than me though. I wouldnt get my car dipped as i doubt there would be a lot left of it!

Good luck with the resto :thumbsup:

Ha, yes that was a nerve racking moment. Regardless what you think you have, there could've been lots of surprises in there!

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I know pictures don't tell the full story, but your car looked mint to begin with. Is it that you are bored that you started a restoration?!!

It's good that you have loads of paperwork, mine doesn't have any, so who knows what has gone on with the car, at least you do.

Good luck. When do you aim to have the car finished? I am going to go to the Grantown on Spey car show in September, maybe I'll see you there with your car?

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Great start I no point and bonnie car, looking forward to seeing this come together 

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9 hours ago, Munch said:

I know pictures don't tell the full story, but your car looked mint to begin with. Is it that you are bored that you started a restoration?!!

It's good that you have loads of paperwork, mine doesn't have any, so who knows what has gone on with the car, at least you do.

Good luck. When do you aim to have the car finished? I am going to go to the Grantown on Spey car show in September, maybe I'll see you there with your car?

No, not mint! haha. It is a very good example. But there was rust in it, and I want a roof skin to get rid of the hideous sunroof someone has had fitted!

That it just been stripped, so it's safe to say it'll not be at this years show! maybe 2019 lol. I may well be at the show with something though.

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There was much I enjoyed in the 80's and I even fitted a couple of cars I owned back then (non Fords mind) with those pop up glass sun roofs. School Boy error looking back it now, glad to hear you're getting rid of it.

As to dipping, been there done that. I wouldn't do it again. 

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That rs looked pretty clean in the pics and even looked clean after being dipped. I know they say to start with the best you can get your hands on but yours looked like it just needed driving!!!
This was how mine looked after blasting.... almost came back in a box!!
Good luck with the re-build and keep the pics comingc218fd922ec01703054d0bc797a01420.jpg1f1e9fa2f2b344de801b17fb55c508bc.jpg

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

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27 minutes ago, Vista said:

There was much I enjoyed in the 80's and I even fitted a couple of cars I owned back then (non Fords mind) with those pop up glass sun roofs. School Boy error looking back it now, glad to hear you're getting rid of it.

As to dipping, been there done that. I wouldn't do it again. 

Yeah I know, been there, fitted them myself too! I agree, big school boy error thinking back!

Really? I'm interested in knowing why? I've never done it before... I've opted for the primmer dip too, so once any bodywork is done, it goes for another quick acid dip, then primmer dipped.

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They sell you it (the process) as the ultimate rust treatment, only the acid gets everywhere and takes out all the historical protection that you can't get anything back into to seal it up and protect it again. The primer they add afterwards is just primer, it's not a rust preventative coating. 

I've cured them all now but for the first two or so years after I finished my car, I was getting rust coming through and needing to be dealt with in places it didn't previously have a rust problem after nearly 30 years on the road. Think inside double skinned areas, or where door skins fold over the frames etc.

To say I was pissed at needing to spend more money on bodywork within 18 months of a bare metal rebuild would be something of an understatement. 

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35 minutes ago, GT65 said:

That rs looked pretty clean in the pics and even looked clean after being dipped. I know they say to start with the best you can get your hands on but yours looked like it just needed driving!!!
This was how mine looked after blasting.... almost came back in a box!!
Good luck with the re-build and keep the pics comingemoji106.png

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
 

Thanks, I'll try.

That's not the worst neither, when you take the age of these cars in to consideration, if you've a rough shell to work from, I'd class that as brilliant. emoji106.png 

Yours has certainly ended up nice, looks great. 

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3 hours ago, Vista said:

They sell you it (the process) as the ultimate rust treatment, only the acid gets everywhere and takes out all the historical protection that you can't get anything back into to seal it up and protect it again. The primer they add afterwards is just primer, it's not a rust preventative coating. 

I've cured them all now but for the first two or so years after I finished my car, I was getting rust coming through and needing to be dealt with in places it didn't previously have a rust problem after nearly 30 years on the road. Think inside double skinned areas, or where door skins fold over the frames etc.

To say I was pissed at needing to spend more money on bodywork within 18 months of a bare metal rebuild would be something of an understatement. 

I've heard of a few cars that have been acid dipped suffer from Seam Bleeding. 

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2 hours ago, Vista said:

They sell you it (the process) as the ultimate rust treatment, only the acid gets everywhere and takes out all the historical protection that you can't get anything back into to seal it up and protect it again. The primer they add afterwards is just primer, it's not a rust preventative coating. 

I've cured them all now but for the first two or so years after I finished my car, I was getting rust coming through and needing to be dealt with in places it didn't previously have a rust problem after nearly 30 years on the road. Think inside double skinned areas, or where door skins fold over the frames etc.

To say I was pissed at needing to spend more money on bodywork within 18 months of a bare metal rebuild would be something of an understatement. 

Yes I've heard that, and that was my concern. But the guys that are doing the body work/spraying swayed  me back to going for the dipping! What I've been told is there is very very few places that can do the acid neutralizing properly to eliminate this!

I feel your pain, and think you could end up being right here... But I'm really really hoping the body-shop is right! 

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Does the priming process being offered include submersing the shell into the primer and thoroughly rotating the shell, or by manually spray painting?

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8 hours ago, dt36 said:

I've heard of a few cars that have been acid dipped suffer from Seam Bleeding. 

Plus the shells tend to suffer from metal sqeaking because the OEM joint and seam sealer has been removed from between the panels.

Ford did put the joint and seam sealer there for a reason.

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14 hours ago, PeterMEscort said:

Plus the shells tend to suffer from metal sqeaking because the OEM joint and seam sealer has been removed from between the panels.

Ford did put the joint and seam sealer there for a reason.

Yes fair point.

14 hours ago, PeterMEscort said:

Does the priming process being offered include submersing the shell into the primer and thoroughly rotating the shell, or by manually spray painting?

Yes, the shell gets booked in to a slot on a modern car factory to get electrophoretic primmer dipped.

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Thanks Cuili1 that has just cleared up a question I have long pondered. Several years ago I heard that the electro dipped primer process was available in the UK. I assumed it was the companies who carried out the acid dipping also offered the electro dipping. You have probably made a good choice which obviously saves the time consuming manual paint stripping.

Here in Australia there are two companies who offer the acid dipping paint and rust removal service. From what i have seen the neutralising procedure is simply immersing the shell in clean water. The shell is then dried off by a man using a large LPG blow torch. Seeing this procedure was a big turn off to me.

Hope you can get a photo of your shell amongst the modern day cars on the production line.

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My car was acid dipped, all work carried out, Re acid dipped on completion and then electrophoretically primed by dipping. Didn't eliminate the seam issues. 

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11 minutes ago, Vista said:

My car was acid dipped, all work carried out, Re acid dipped on completion and then electrophoretically primed by dipping. Didn't eliminate the seam issues. 

I hope I have better luck, I've started now... :shock:

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i did a lot of soul searching on the process, but every professional restorer and spray shop I spoke to at the time, advised me against it, glad I took their advice tbh, as ive heard nothing but nightmare stories since, and it was also probably the dearest way restore the shell as well, but that was 5 years ago, things and processes may have changed, but their main thins were as Scott says, removing OEM protection that you cannot put back, and the bleed out once you start painting

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Interesting. Then the acid must must remain trapped in the seams and gaps mixed with the remnants of the joint and seam sealer that the acid could not remove.

I also have done a lot of soul searching and speaking with professionals about the latest trends on the acid dipping process, but decided against it.

With my current resto I once again chose to chemical paint strip the entire shell by hand to about 99% clean, then took the shell to a trusted friend who owns a small media blasting company for a LOW pressure media blast all over. Immediately on removal (within minutes) from the blast chamber I two pack etch primed and undercoated everything. We even selected a warm low humidity day.

There is a definite attraction to start the resto with a totally clean shell that has been acid dipped. I always assumed the redipping in electrophoretic primer would wash out the remaining acid to give the perfect result.

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1 hour ago, Ray said:

i did a lot of soul searching on the process, but every professional restorer and spray shop I spoke to at the time, advised me against it, glad I took their advice tbh, as ive heard nothing but nightmare stories since, and it was also probably the dearest way restore the shell as well, but that was 5 years ago, things and processes may have changed, but their main thins were as Scott says, removing OEM protection that you cannot put back, and the bleed out once you start painting

I was the same myself TBH, and had actually decided against it, just because of everything I'd heard/read. Then, when I picked my bodyshop and spoke to those guys, they changed my mind. They sent me off with a list of customers that they had pained or done full restoration on. All of had opted for this process, and none has had an issue. One guy tells me his MK2 was done 21 years ago and it's covered 30k since!

So the big questions are... Is it down to what company dip/strip and prime it?? I've been told, yes. Is it down to how it's dealt with in the bodyshop after the process?? I've also been told, yes.

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